Outcomes

Peer-reviewed, real world clinical and financial outcomes

Hello Heart’s clinical impact has been observed in multiple peer-reviewed studies, and a third-party claims analysis found significant potential cost savings for employers.

The information on this page is intended to help organizations evaluate Hello Heart.
Peer reviewed
Engagement level

“The level of engagement is something I have not seen in other digital hypertension management programs.”

UCSF Avatar

Dr. Alexis Beatty
Cardiologist and Associate Professor, UCSF

Clinical Outcomes

Peer-reviewed clinical studies

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Study

Assessment of hypertension control among adults participating in a mobile technology blood pressure self-management program

  • Publication: JAMA Network Open, 2021
  • Participants: 28,189 Hello Heart app users
  • Duration: 3 years
Key Findings
- 84% of members with baseline blood pressure over 140/90 reduced blood pressure, sustained up to 3 years1
- 21 mmHg average reduction in systolic blood pressure over 3 years1 — a 2x greater improvement than any other digital heart health solution2
Conclusion
“The findings of this study suggest that a mobile technology hypertension self-management program can support long-term blood pressure (BP) control and very high BP detection. Such programs may improve real-world BP monitoring and control.”
Read the Study
Read the study
Users chart
Elevated, stage 1, and stage 2 users all reduced their blood pressure, sustained up to 3 years.3,4,5
Harvard UCLA
Study

Improving patient engagement in self-measured blood pressure monitoring using a mobile health technology

  • Publication: Health Information Science & Systems, 2017
  • Participants: 5,115 Hello Heart app users
  • Duration: 6 months
Key Findings
- 57% of members with baseline blood pressure ≥ 140/90 achieved blood pressure normalization at 4 weeks6
- 69% of members with baseline systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 achieved blood pressure normalization at 22 weeks6
Conclusion
“Significant decrease in BP with improved metrics over time. Higher engagement was associated with greater BP reduction and engagement was higher among those with greater clinical need of BP control.”
Read the Study
Read the study

High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for heart disease.7

Research shows that even a 10mmHg drop cuts the risk of: 8

Major cardiovascular disease events by:
20%
Heart failure by:
28%
Coronary heart disease by:
17%
Stroke by:
27%
All-cause mortality by:
13%
Financial Outcomes

Claims analysis found 19% potential cost savings9

An analysis of 2017-2020 employer claims data commissioned by Hello Heart found substantial savings in total Year 1 medical costs per Hello Heart user compared to matched nonusers.
Download the Report
Read the study

$1,865

potentially saved in year 1 total medical costs per participant9

potentially saved in year 1 total medical costs per person among Hello Heart app users compared to matched non-users9

2:1 ROI

hello heart has a high ROI for employers

An analysis of employer claims data among Hello Heart’s book of business suggests that employers with Hello Heart could see a minimum 2:1 return on investment, depending on employer size.10

Leading brands are already achieving meaningful outcomes

International Airline

How one leading international airline empowered employees to lower their high blood pressure

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medical device company

How one employer in the medical device industry lowered employee heart risk

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Health System

Putting healthcare workers' heart health first during the pandemic

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Male user 11
55 years old
Active user for
3 Years
Checked BP
103 times
Average reduction
21 mmHg
USER OUTCOMES

Industry-leading user engagement drives lasting lifestyle change

Hello Heart’s coaching app helps people manage their hypertension by providing personalized wellness and lifestyle tips, which may help reduce the risks of high blood pressure and heart disease.

Resources for benefits leaders, consultants, and health plans

Fact sheet

Can a digital health solution actually improve heart health — and an employer’s bottom line?

WHITEPAPER

Reducing Cardiovascular Spend: How to help your members avoid costly invasive procedures through preventative digital care

FAct sheet

Beyond a Promise: Hello Heart achieved Validation Institute’s Level 1 - Savings certification by demonstrating a significant reduction in healthcare spend

WHITEPAPER

How Digital Health Is Tackling High Blood Pressure and Heart Disease

From our Blog

Take action now on heart health

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Footnotes
  1. Gazit T, Gutman M, Beatty AL. Assessment of Hypertension Control Among Adults Participating in a Mobile Technology Blood Pressure Self-management Program. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(10):e2127008, https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.27008. Accessed May 23, 2022. (Some study authors are employed by Hello Heart. Because of the observational nature of the study, causal conclusions cannot be made. There were 108 participants with baseline blood pressure over 140/90 who had been enrolled in the program for 3 years and had application activity during weeks 148-163. See additional important study limitations in the publication.)
  2. Sources: (1) Gazit T, Gutman M, Beatty AL. Assessment of Hypertension Control Among Adults Participating in a Mobile Technology Blood Pressure Self-management Program. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(10):e2127008, https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.27008. Accessed May 23, 2022. (Some study authors are employed by Hello Heart. Because of the observational nature of the study, causal conclusions cannot be made. See additional important study limitations in the publication. This study showed that 108 participants with baseline blood pressure over 140/90 who had been enrolled in the program for 3 years and had application activity during weeks 148-163 were able to reduce their blood pressure by 21 mmHg using the Hello Heart program.) (2) Livongo Health, Inc. Form S-1 Registration Statement. https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1639225/000119312519185159/d731249ds1.htm. Published June 28, 2019. Accessed May 23, 2022. (In a pilot study that lasted six weeks, individuals starting with a blood pressure of greater than 140/90 mmHg, on average, had a 10 mmHG reduction.) NOTE: This comparison is not based on a head-to-head study, and the difference in results may be due in part to different study protocols.
  3. Gazit T, Gutman M, Beatty AL. Assessment of Hypertension Control Among Adults Participating in a Mobile Technology Blood Pressure Self-management Program. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(10):e2127008, https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.27008. Accessed May 23, 2022. (Some study authors are employed by Hello Heart. Because of the observational nature of the study, causal conclusions cannot be made. There were 495 participants with baseline systolic blood pressure of 120-129 mmHg who had been enrolled in the program for 1 year and had application activity during weeks 48-55. There were 258 participants with baseline systolic blood pressure of 120-129 mmHg who had been enrolled in the program for 2 years and had application activity during weeks 96-111. There were 83 participants with baseline systolic blood pressure of 120-129 mmHg who had been enrolled in the program for 3 years and had application activity during weeks 148-163. See additional important study limitations in the publication.)
  4. Gazit T, Gutman M, Beatty AL. Assessment of Hypertension Control Among Adults Participating in a Mobile Technology Blood Pressure Self-management Program. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(10):e2127008, https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.27008. Accessed May 23, 2022. (Some study authors are employed by Hello Heart. Because of the observational nature of the study, causal conclusions cannot be made. There were 673 participants with baseline systolic blood pressure of 130-139 mmHg who had been enrolled in the program for 1 year and had application activity during weeks 48-55. There were 318 participants with baseline systolic blood pressure of 130-139 mmHg who had been enrolled in the program for 2 years and had application activity during weeks 96-111. There were 99 participants with baseline systolic blood pressure of 130-139 mmHg who had been enrolled in the program for 3 years and had application activity during weeks 148-163. See additional important study limitations in the publication.)
  5. Gazit T, Gutman M, Beatty AL. Assessment of Hypertension Control Among Adults Participating in a Mobile Technology Blood Pressure Self-management Program. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(10):e2127008, https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.27008. Accessed May 23, 2022. (Some study authors are employed by Hello Heart. Because of the observational nature of the study, causal conclusions cannot be made. There were 1,074 participants with baseline blood pressure over 140/90 who had been enrolled in the program for 1 year and had application activity during weeks 48-55. There were 419 participants with baseline blood pressure over 140/90 who had been enrolled in the program for 2 years and had application activity during weeks 96-111. There were 108 participants with baseline blood pressure over 140/90 who had been enrolled in the program for 3 years and had application activity during weeks 148-163. See additional important study limitations in the publication.)
  6. Kaplan AL, Cohen ER, Zimlichman E. Improving patient engagement in self-measured blood pressure monitoring using a mobile health technology. Health Inf Sci Syst. 2017; 5 (4). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13755-017-0026-9. Accessed May 23, 2022 (Because of the observational nature of the study, causal conclusions cannot be made. There were 783 participants with baseline systolic blood pressure ≥ 140. See additional important study limitations in the publication.)
  7. Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Control Hypertension. CDC Web site. https://www.cdc.gov/bloodpressure/docs/SG-CTA-HTN-Control-Report-508.pdf. Published 2020. Accessed May 23, 2022.
  8. Ettehad D, Emdin CA, Kiran A, Anderson SG, Callender T, Emberson J, et al. Blood pressure lowering for prevention of cardiovascular disease and death: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet. 2016;387(10022):957-967. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)01225-8. Accessed May 23, 2022.
  9. Validation Institute. 2021 Validation Report (Valid Through October 2022). https://validationinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Hello_Heart-Savings-2021-Final.pdf. Published October 2021. Accessed May 23, 2022. (This analysis was commissioned by Hello Heart, which provided a summary report of self-funded employer client medical claims data for 203 Hello Heart users and 200 non-users from 2017-2020. Findings have not been subjected to peer review.)
  10. Depends on employer size. Based on data on file at Hello Heart. Results may differ from employer to employer.
  11. While the data featured here reflects a real user, the person shown in the photograph is a model and is not an actual user of, nor affiliated with, Hello Heart.